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Press
King tides spark wave of interest
Written by Kaci Poor, Times Standard   

Volunteers across California gain insight into sea level rise by documenting the year's highest tides

11/16/12

When a “king tide” hit the local coastline Thursday — an unusually high tide caused by solar and lunar gravita­tional pull — the result was submerged streets in King Salmon, flooded cow pas­tures and inundated shore­lines on Indian Island.




National Weather Service spokesman Troy Nicolini said the lowest areas in King Salmon could be hit again today, with especially strong southerly winds pushing water onto the shore.




“The wind pushes water onto the coast, which exacer­bates the astronomical tides,” he said.

Read more...
 
More than $100K in grants offered
Written by Times Standard   

10/18/12

Do you know why the eelgrass beds of Humboldt Bay are so important to the Pacific Coast? Thanks in part to the William Adrian and Lillian Robinson Memorial Fund, you can find out while enjoying a free guided tour onboard a 25-foot Boston Whaler.




Launching most weekends through the summer and fall, trained Humboldt Baykeeper volunteers share the maritime history and ecological information about Humboldt Bay with neighbors, students and friends. This was just one of many programs funded throughout the region with a “Field of Interest” grant.

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Explore the bay this summer
Written by Times Standard   

7/5/12

Humboldt Baykeeper offers free, natural history tours of Humboldt Bay every weekend this summer.

 

Bay Explorations tours are informative excursions on Humboldt Bay led by knowledgeable volunteer docents trained in the ecology and history of the local watershed. The Baykeeper, a 25-foot Boston whaler, fits about six participants for these hourlong adventures.

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New app to feature beach information
Written by Times Standard   

5/31/12


California swimmers, surfers and beachgoers can now check their smart phone for the closest, cleanest beaches in their area.


The new app, available through the Waterkeeper Alliance, will also help beach-goers determine if the water is safe for swimming, according to a Humboldt Baykeeper press release. The Swim Guide also allows people to share their adventure with friends and families via social networks, according to the release.

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Eureka City Council scraps Waterfront Drive extension; alternative projects possible in future
Written by Donna Tam, Times Standard   

4/18/12

The Eureka City Council decided Tuesday to abandon the Waterfront Drive extension project after reviewing the project's opposition and potential for litigation.

 

”I do believe that this horse is dead, and we keep beating it,” Councilman Lance Madsen said before the council voted 3 - 2 to scrap the project. Councilman Mike Newman and Councilwoman Marian Brady dissented.

 

Newman said he couldn't support the motion because the project seemed to be a welcome idea during the city's visioning sessions. He said he would like to postpone the decision and gather more public input on the issue.

 

”I believe we need to go through more of a public process on this before we say no to Waterfront Drive,” he said.

 

The project -- a two-lane extension of Waterfront Drive from Del Norte Street to Hilfiker Lane -- has been on hold for nearly two years. The city began the project's environmental review process in 2004 but came to a standstill in 2010 due to opposition from environmental groups and the California Coastal Commission, an agency that would eventually review the project's permits. Commission staff were concerned the project is inconsistent with the California Coastal Act and would negatively impact surrounding wetlands.

 

The council heard from several environmental groups at its meeting Tuesday, with representatives from the Northcoast Environmental Center and Humboldt Baykeeper emphasizing that the project is considered inconsistent with state coastal law. NEC Board President Larry Glass said the organization has been concerned with the project since 2005.

 

”Fast forward to 2012, and nothing has changed,” he said. “It's just as illegal and inconsistent as it was in 2005.”

 

So far, the city has spent $385,000 of public transportation funds on the environmental impact report, leaving $153,000 remaining for more environmental work, according to city staff. Continuing the environmental review meant the city would have to request more transportation dollars from the Humboldt County Association of Governments. Because of the time passed, staff would have to revisit most of the work that has already been done to make sure its still applicable.

 

Councilwoman Linda Atkins said the project has too many obstacles, and the money would be better spent on other transportation projects like filling in gaps in the existing drive. The environmental review could cost another $300,000 to complete, at which point there will probably be lawsuits against the city over the report, Atkins said, and ultimately the Coastal Commission would reject the project.

 

”This is a total waste of our money and our time. And it's going to get us into a huge litigation, and it won't get us anywhere in the long run because we won't be able to build it,” she said. 

 

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